Introduction to Mike Scotti, Part I

This blog posting it is the first in a series where I am going to introduce the readers of this blog to Mr. Mike Scotti. Mike is a very interesting individual that we had as a guest on You Served Radio last night. I was honored to get to talk to him and am looking forward to working with him more in the future on several things that are of interest to both of us.

This first blog posting about Mike is an initial introduction to this Marine warrior and the recent piece he wrote for cnn.com. In fact Mike is going to be featured in Newsweek next week and be on CNN in a few days. Mike is the film-maker, editor, creator of the real-world Iraq war documentary, Severe Clear.

 

Mike’s piece he wrote for CNN.com offers a glimpse into him as a man, as a Marine and as a vet. He also discusses how he is not capitalizing on the release of the movie, Severe Clear but instead is using it as a rung in the ladder to greater and bigger things.

I looked around. The chamber music quartet, the beautiful bridesmaids, the steak dinner … none of it was real. My buddies were, at that moment, probably on patrol and quite possibly engaged with the enemy. That was real.

And as for the other guests at the table who were staring at me in my dress blues, we were no longer even the same species.

 

You can read the entire piece at http://www.cnn.com/2010/OPINION/03/10/scotti.war.veterans/index.html

 

Look for Part II about the interview and Part III, my review of the film Severe Clear in the  coming days.

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3 Responses to Introduction to Mike Scotti, Part I

  1. GordonNo Gravatar says:

    That feeling of isolations is to real for us Vietnam Vet.
    I walked those empty streets for years after returning, just waiting for that out stretched had to no avail. It was not until I got off the Plane in Dallas TX. on my return from a tour in Iraq that I clasped it and finally came home.
    You articulate that feeling much better than I ever could.
    Welcome home brother.

  2. GordonNo Gravatar says:

    That feeling of isolations is to real for us Vietnam Vet.
    I walked those empty streets for years after returning, just waiting for that out stretched hand to no avail. It was not until I got off the Plane in Dallas TX. on my return from a tour in Iraq that I clasped it and finally came home.
    You articulate that feeling much better than I ever could.
    Welcome home brother.

  3. CarolNo Gravatar says:

    Thanks for this. I want to know all I can so that I can do all I can to help my beleoved warriors.